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Act of climacteric on well-being: a survey based on 5213 women 39 to 60 years old. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993, 168:772?80. Holte A: Prevalence of climacteric complaints in a representative sample of middle-aged women in Oslo, Norway. J Psycosom Obstet Gynaecol 1991, 12:303?17. Stearns V, Ullmer L, Lopez JF, Smith J, Isaacs C, Hayes DF: Hot flushes. Lancet 2002, 360:1851?861. Bardel A, Wallander MA,
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E not available for all women. Furthermore the numbers of women in early menopause were few. These complications of data led us to the crude analysis used in the study. However, our analysis was good enough to show the variability between women, and suggest the need for larger follow-up studies to describe the natural course of menopausal symptoms. To estimate the duration of symptoms among unsele
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Ttle change in the prevalence of women reporting bothersome pains.CommentsAbout two thirds of the women in this selected group of women reported vasomotor symptoms and about half reported them being bothersome symptoms. There was a notable variation in the development over time in the prevalence of bothersome symptoms. The development over time was related both to the timing of entering the study,
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En 19?4.Our sample size was too small to analyze this in relation to background characteristics to explain the variation. The results of the longitudinal analysis (comparing the same women over time) and those of the cross-sectional analysis showed relatively similar results. Thus, we can interpret the cross-sectional data as generally summing up the experience of all women throughout the followup
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Uscript. RL commented the manuscript. PV participated in the designing of the analysis and commented the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. Acknowledgement This study was partly financed by Academy of Finland grant 2007?010 (decision number 115088). We thank all women who participated in the trial, the trial staff at clinical centres, and the staff at the National Inst
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E not available for all women. Furthermore the numbers of women in early menopause were few. These complications of data led us to the crude analysis used in the study. However, our analysis was good enough to show the variability between women, and suggest the need for larger follow-up studies to describe the natural course of menopausal symptoms. To estimate the duration of symptoms among unsele
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En 19?4.Our sample size was too small to analyze this in relation to background characteristics to explain the variation. The results of the longitudinal analysis (comparing the same women over time) and those of the cross-sectional analysis showed relatively similar results. Thus, we can interpret the cross-sectional data as generally summing up the experience of all women throughout the followup
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Ps were very similar by the studied background characteristics. Table 2 gives the prevalence of vasomotor symptoms according to a cross-sectional analysis. At the time of recruitment, about two thirds of the women reported vasomotor symptoms, and about a half regarded them as bothersome. In the survey a year later, less (53 ) of women reported vasomotor symptoms and a third found them bothersome.