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T least one of these symptoms was said to be bothersome,Hemminki et al. BMC Women's Health 2012, 12:44 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/12/Page 3 ofthe woman was categorized as having bothersome symptoms of that group.Table 2 Proportions ( ) of women with vasomotor symptoms and bothersome symptoms1 in past two weeks, at each survey (cross-sectional analysis)Recruitment Women
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En 19?4.Our sample size was too small to analyze this in relation to background characteristics to explain the variation. The results of the longitudinal analysis (comparing the same women over time) and those of the cross-sectional analysis showed relatively similar results. Thus, we can interpret the cross-sectional data as generally summing up the experience of all women throughout the followup
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Ps were very similar by the studied background characteristics. Table 2 gives the prevalence of vasomotor symptoms according to a cross-sectional analysis. At the time of recruitment, about two thirds of the women reported vasomotor symptoms, and about a half regarded them as bothersome. In the survey a year later, less (53 ) of women reported vasomotor symptoms and a third found them bothersome.
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At the studied menopausal symptoms were four times more common among those who initially expressed an interest than among those who were not interested at the time of asking [25]. Thus, at a population level, the prevalence of symptoms is much lower, but we know nothing of whether the disturbance and variability among those who have symptoms is the same as in our trial. For comparison, we studied
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Ffice buildings in Singapore. Indoor Air 2003, 13:315?31.24. Statish U, Mendell MJ, Shekhar K, Hotchi T, Sullivan D, Streufert S, Fisk WJ: Is CO2 an indoor pollutant? Direct effects of low-to-moderate CO2 concentrations on human decision-making performance. Environ Health Perspect 2012, 120(12):1671?677. 25. Wargocki P, Wyon DP, Sundell J, Clausen G, Fanger PO: The effects of outdoor air supply ra
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E not available for all women. Furthermore the numbers of women in early menopause were few. These complications of data led us to the crude analysis used in the study. However, our analysis was good enough to show the variability between women, and suggest the need for larger follow-up studies to describe the natural course of menopausal symptoms. To estimate the duration of symptoms among unsele
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En 19?4.Our sample size was too small to analyze this in relation to background characteristics to explain the variation. The results of the longitudinal analysis (comparing the same women over time) and those of the cross-sectional analysis showed relatively similar results. Thus, we can interpret the cross-sectional data as generally summing up the experience of all women throughout the followup
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Not included in the present analysis. The women in the blind arms received their drug bottles with coded labels (otherwise identical bottles). Women in the non-blind HT arm had their drug bottles marked with HT. Only data on women in blind placebo group and nontreatment group aged 50?9 at recruitment (n = 486) are used in this study. Throughout the trial, about 90 ofwomen in the non-treatment gro