Search results for "gkt137831 1218942-37-0" | AIRPIM
1
En 19?4.Our sample size was too small to analyze this in relation to background characteristics to explain the variation. The results of the longitudinal analysis (comparing the same women over time) and those of the cross-sectional analysis showed relatively similar results. Thus, we can interpret the cross-sectional data as generally summing up the experience of all women throughout the followup
1
Foxcroft et al. BMC PregnancyT at www.biomedcentral.com/submitFoxcroft et al. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2013, 13:3 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2393/13/RESEARCH ARTICLEOpen AccessDevelopment and validation of a pregnancy symptoms inventoryKatie F Foxcroft1, Leonie K Callaway2, Nuala M Byrne3* and Joan WebsterAbstractBackground: Physical symptoms are common in pregnancy and are
1
Omen with bothersome symptoms first increased and then decreased. Conclusions: There was a notable variability in the development of disturbing vasomotor symptoms over time in a selected group of women aged 50?9. Population-based follow-up studies of untreated women would be useful to estimate the symptom burden. Keywords: Menopausal symptoms, Duration, Follow-up, EstoniaBackground A number of stu
1
Same. Some women had symptoms variably (i.e. having one or more measurements without symptoms and then again reporting symptoms). Younger women did not systematically have more bothersome symptoms than older women. Comparing the proportions of women with bothersome symptoms at various times to those in the crosssectional analysis of Table 2 reveals relatively similar percentages. For comparison, w
1
Fferent surveys using the date of filling in the questionnaire. We then grouped the surveys as follows: 6?8 months = 1-year follow-up, 19?8 months = 2-year follow-up, 29?2 months = 3year follow-up, 43?9 months =4-year follow-up. Women who left one or more follow-up surveys unanswered formed a separate group (intermittent surveys). We classified women into those who had or had not had symptoms in t
1
Same. Some women had symptoms variably (i.e. having one or more measurements without symptoms and then again reporting symptoms). Younger women did not systematically have more bothersome symptoms than older women. Comparing the proportions of women with bothersome symptoms at various times to those in the crosssectional analysis of Table 2 reveals relatively similar percentages. For comparison, w
1
E not available for all women. Furthermore the numbers of women in early menopause were few. These complications of data led us to the crude analysis used in the study. However, our analysis was good enough to show the variability between women, and suggest the need for larger follow-up studies to describe the natural course of menopausal symptoms. To estimate the duration of symptoms among unsele
1
Unmilola OM, Taiwo LO: Experience of menopausal symptoms by women in an urban community in Ibadan, Nigeria. Menopause 2008, 16:1?. 5. R str K, Bengtsson C, Lissner L, Milsom I, Sundh V, Bj kelund C: A longitudinal study of the treatment of hot flushes: the population study of women in Gothenburg during a quarter of a century. Menopause 2002, 9:156?61. 6. National Institutes of Health state of sci